MacOS Binary Changes

As a result of a recent change in our build-scripts, the directory layout of our macOS tarballs has changed. Many developers had requested that we ship our binaries in the native macOS binary layout rather than our traditional JDK layout.

Why the change?

There are several good reasons to change the directory layout to match most of the other Java implementations. The main reason that we have chosen to do so is to allow our Homebrew recipes to be merged into core making it much easier for developers to easily download our binaries!

What does this mean for me?

Essentially the directory tree has changed, previously when you extracted our macOS tarballs the bin and lib directories were located in the root directory. Native macOS Java binaries alongside most other Java implementations don’t come bundled this way. Instead a Contents directory containing Home and MacOS directories along with an Info.plist file is shipped.

What do I need to change?

The actual OpenJDK binary is identical so your Java applications will run in the exact same way but you may need to modify your PATH to accommodate these changes. If you are looking for the bin and lib directories, they are now located inside Contents/Home/bin and Contents/Home/lib.

.
└── Contents
    ├── Home
    │   ├── bin
    │   ├── conf
    │   ├── demo
    │   ├── include
    │   ├── jmods
    │   ├── legal
    │   ├── lib
    │   ├── man
    │   └── release
    ├── Info.plist
    └── MacOS
        └── libjli.dylib -> ../Home/lib/jli/libjli.dylib

 

 

Using IcedTea Web-browser Plug-in with AdoptOpenJDK.

When Java went Open, the whole of Java developer community was like “whoo hooo!”, and everyone has been embracing OpenJDK with wide open arms. The AdoptOpenJDK community took the lead in making users life easier by providing prebuilt OpenJDK binaries from a fully open source set of build scripts and infrastructure.

However, the Java WebStart Wizard used to create the XML-based JNLP (Java Network Launching Protocol) definition file, that the Web Start software uses to download and run Java applications and applets on client machines was not Open Sourced as part of OpenJDK.

Thankfully the GNU Classpath community come up with a free software implementation of Java Web Start and the Java web browser plugin for running applets and thus our hero IcedTea-Web was born.

We have produced a short slide deck @Running Web Start Application
And a video @ Setting up AdoptOpenJDK with IcedTea-Web showing you how to get the IcedTea WebStart plugin working with AdoptOpenJDK binaries.

Voila!! Go ahead and run your WebStart applications to your heart’s content.